Usher in a bountiful Chinese New Year of the Pig at Yàn

 

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Joyful reunions abound with delectable festive creations at Yàn this Lunar New Year. Indulge in an exquisite selection of auspicious set menus and hearty Pen Cai, specially curated by Executive Chinese Chef Lai Chi Sum to celebrate the Year of the Pig.

Cultural significance of the pig

The pig has held a noteworthy status in Chinese culture through centuries. The character for home carries with it a meaningful history of over three thousand years. First appearing as a depiction of a pig inside a house, which indicates the importance of having a pig in one’s dwelling as a symbol of wealth and prosperity, the simple sketch has evolved to its modern form that continues to combine the structures for house and pig.
The well-loved farm animal is so intrinsically tied to Chinese cuisine that the Chinese character for meat is synonymous with pork unless indicated otherwise on menus. In major celebrations and banquets, several auspicious dishes featuring pork are
indispensable items. It is also believed that those born in the year of the pig bear the qualities of generosity, diligence, and an innate enjoyment of the finer aspects of life, such as getting together over good food.

 

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Sumptuous feasts for a plentiful year ahead

To usher in an abundant Year of the Pig, Yàn encapsulates the auspiciousness of Lunar New Year in six set menus, ranging from $128++ to $278++ per person, and a bounteous Pen Cai thoughtfully prepared to nourish the spirit of togetherness. Set within a cosy ambience with warm hospitality, Yàn inspires conviviality in intimate gatherings, lively family affairs, or corporate gatherings.

 

Reunion meals commence on a auspicious note with the Kaleidoscope of Prosperity (Shun De Style). An artful masterpiece, the mountain of crispy fried vermicelli is topped with gold leaves, resembling a mountain of golds, and ringed with a vibrant medley of vegetables, sesame seeds, crispy youtiao, as well as slices of fresh salmon or yellow tail. The signature creation is finished with an auspicious nod to the year’s zodiac sign – deep red bakkwa.

 

Impeccable Cantonese classics emerge from the suckling pig done in three refined ways. The crisp skin of the Signature Roast Crispy Suckling Pig in an auspicious shade of red signify good luck, while the Suckling Pig Carved Shoulder and Oven-baked Pig Fillet with Lemongrass present servings of happiness and prosperity with perfectly succulent meat.
The wonderful feasts welcome auspicious ingredients, such as fish, which convey wishes for surplus and prosperity. Highlights include silky smooth Superior Chicken Broth with Fish Maw and steamed fish,a Cantonese classic prepared with fish such as sea perch, soon hock, or star grouper. Representing the well-wishes for longevity are noodle dishes such as Braised Ee-Fu Noodles with Dried Scallop and Enoki Mushroom and Braised ‘MeePok’ with Fresh Mushroom and XO Sauce.

 
Yàn’s festive essentials also include seafood, such as lobster, prawns, sea cucumber, and abalone. The latter, symbolising good fortune and prosperity, is braised to bring forth its innate sweetness, while Steamed Half Lobster with 18 years Nu Er Hong Rice Wine is infused with the vintage’s unique flavour. Enjoyment of the steamed lobster is further enhanced with a pour of Nu Er Hong rice wine on the side that is to be added into the dish, or savoured as a rich and aromatic drink.

 
Pan-fried Nian Gao, a popular treat during Lunar New Year as its name sounds similar to higher year, hence it expresses one’s wish for a better year ahead. The sweet festive goodie accompanies Chilled Peach Resin with Osmanthus and Aloe Vera Jelly, Hot Walnut Cream, and Double-boiled Hashima with Lotus Seed and Red Dates to round up the joyous reunions on a meaningful note. Desserts such as Deep-Fried Sesame Rice Ball and Hot Red Bean Cream with Glutinous Rice Ball bring symbols of togetherness to the table in the round shape of the rice balls.

 

 

 

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Superior Chicken Broth with Fish Maw 浓鸡汤花胶

Chicken broth with fish maw, dried scallops, and goji berries.

The broth is slowly brewed for about 10 hours using old chickens. It is first double-boiled, then cooked over high heat to achieve its smooth consistency.

 

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Kaleidoscope of Prosperity 鱼跃龍門彩虹鱼生

Crispy fried vermicelli, sliced red, green and yellow capsicum, pickled ginger, pickled Japanese radish, red cabbage, cucumber, fried taro, crispy youtiao, sesame, bakkwa, gold flakes, dressed with soy sauce, lime juice, sliced lemon leaves and peanut oil

 

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Yusheng originated in Guang Zhou. In Shunde, fishermen used to celebrate Ren Ri (7th day of Chinese New Year) by eating raw slices of river fish (grass carp) with soy sauce and pickles.

 

 

 

 

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Signature Roast Crispy Suckling Pig 片皮乳猪

Crispy skin is served with house-made pancake, plum sauce, cucumber stick, and spring onions.

 

 

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One of three ways Yàn serves the suckling pig

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Suckling Pig Carved Shoulder 乳猪斩件边腿肉

One of three ways Yàn serves the suckling pig.

Oven-baked Pig Fillet with Lemongrass 香茅翻烧猪背肉

One of three ways Yàn serves the suckling pig.
Tender pork fillet is marinated with barbecue sauce and baked with lemongrass for 15 minutes at 280 degrees celsius

Two different method of cooking and placed on the same plate above.

 

 

 

 

 

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Steamed Half Lobster with 18yrs Nu Er Hong Rice Wine 十八年绍兴女儿蒸开边龙虾

Half lobster is steamed atop a bed of lobster roe and Nu Er Hong Rice Wine, and accompanied with a serving of Nu Er Hong Rice Wine.

The accompaniment of rice wine may be enjoyed with the steamed lobster in two ways: added into the dish, or on its own.

 

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Braised ‘Mee Pok’ with Fresh Mushroom and XO Sauce 极品酱鲜菌焖面

Braised mee pok, fresh mushrooms and seasonal green, topped with housemade XO sauce.

House made XO sauce consists of more than 20 ingredients: mainly dried scallops, dried shrimps, salted fish, Jin Hua ham, prawn roe, and chillis.
Noodle is blanched in hot water and cooled off in cold water, then sautéed with XO sauce and chicken stock.

 

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Pan-fried Nian Gao 香煎年糕

Coconut sugar, glutinous rice flour are mixed with water, then steamed. It is lightly pan fried and coated with toasted grated coconut and crushed peanuts

 

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Chilled Peach Resin with Osmanthus and Aloe Vera Jelly 桂花桃胶芦荟冻

Refreshing chilled dessert with peach resin, osmanthus, and aloe vera

 

 

 

 

 

Heralding happiness home
Festivities are further heightened with the hearty Yàn Harvest Pen Cai (from $190 for 5 persons). In homage to the Year of the Pig, the Pen Cai features pig trotter, roast pork, and dried pig skin. The savoury pot of prosperity also includes braised gourmet delicacies such as sea cucumber,prawns,and whole conpoy. Whole abalones are available for those who wish to add the sought-after delicacy to the prosperous feast.

 

In the Year of the Pig, rejoice in reunion with perfect festive delights at Yàn. 

Yàn’s Lunar New Year offers are available during lunch and dinner, from 18 January to 19 February 2019. Set menus are priced from $128++ to $278++ per person. Items on the set menu are also available for àla carte orders.
The Harvest Pen Cai is available for dine-in and take away, with prices starting from $190 and the option to add on whole abalones from $12 nett per piece. Orders for Harvest Pen Cai should be placed 2 days in advance.
From 4 February to 19 February 2019, Lunar New Year àla carte and dim sum menus will be available. The special à la carte menu is available during lunch and dinner, while the festive dim sum menu is exclusively available during lunch on Saturdays, Sundays, and Public Holidays

 

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Address:

#05-02 National Gallery Singapore 1 St Andrew’s Road, Singapore 178957
Reservations: Call (65) 6384 5585

Email reserve@Yan.com.sg

Book online via CHOPE http://bit.ly/219xw4u
Website: http://www.Yan.com.sg

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